Prince Edward County’s Newspaper of Record
June 13, 2024
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News
April 10, 2024
Volume 194 No. 15

Beautiful Bowls

TheRoc's fundraiser running over with generosity
<p>Students from theROC (From left) Jaiden Bennett, Abigail Young, Maggy Solenthaler, Josey Solenthaler, and Walker McCumber show off some of the bowls that will be available for Empty Bowls, a fundraising effort that features soup, bread and deserts from local restaurants and pottery crafted at Ye11ow Studio. (Jason Parks/Gazette Staff)(Jason Parks/Gazette Staff)</p>
Students from theROC (From left) Jaiden Bennett, Abigail Young, Maggy Solenthaler, Josey Solenthaler, and Walker McCumber show off some of the bowls that will be available for Empty Bowls, a fundraising effort that features soup, bread and deserts from local restaurants and pottery crafted at Ye11ow Studio. (Jason Parks/Gazette Staff)(Jason Parks/Gazette Staff)

Returning for its fourth serving, theROC’s “Empty Bowls” fundraiser is fast approaching. 

The name recognizes the work of Dawn Middleton and the team at The Ye11ow Studio, which creates the handmade stoneware bowls, and has done every year for the four years of the fundraiser. In turn, restaurants, chefs and bakers offer delicious soups, desserts, and fresh rolls.

Participants this year include The Acoustic Grill, Bocado, The Blue Sail Seafood Co., The County Canteen, Creekside Cafe, Chef Chris Bryne, Coaches, Lily’s Cafe, The Agrarian Market, Sand & Pearl Oyster Bar, Beau Bistro, Picnic PEC, Quaich & Banter, Hartleys Tavern, Gather, PECish, Jackson’s Falls Country Inn, The Royal Hotel, and Flame+Smith.

“Five years ago, it was a completely different set of circumstances for the students visiting theROC,” said rep Hilary Fennell. “There can be no denying the pandemic’s interruption of school and social activities  had a detrimental impact on our young people. We see that displayed every day here. Now, more than ever, theROC’s programs help bridge social development gaps and provide a return to normalcy.”

The centre is at its busiest around lunch time, when about 60 hot lunches are served daily. After school, the centre starts to buzz again with as many as 40 teens for after-school programming. Over 4,000 people have visited since September. Nearly 30 active volunteers play a role in the day-to-day operations, supporting academics, food service, cleaning, fundraising, and more.

Ms. Fennell noted theROC is excited to return to offering a program at rural elementary schools called “Get Grounded.” The three-week mental wellbeing workshop is designed for those in Grade 8 and eases the transition to high school.

“theROC Youth Services is essential to our community. We have positively impacted the lives of thousands of young people for over two decades. It is our ‘little community that could’ which allows us to continue.”

In its 24th year of operation, theROC Youth Services provides essential, barrier-free support to those aged 12-18. Its five key pillars include Academic Support, Basic Needs, Justice System Navigation, Leadership Skills & Social Development, and Mental Wellbeing.

On Thursday, May 9th ticket holders visit theRoc at 299 Picton Main Street between 12-5 p.m. to select their bowl, soup and dessert. For more information and to get tickets, see theRoc’s website. 

This text is from the Volume 194 No. 15 edition of The Picton Gazette
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